HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP MAY FUEL COLON CANCER | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP MAY FUEL COLON CANCER

It’s no secret that health experts and nutritionists have been wary of high fructose corn syrup for years. But now they have one more reason to advocate against it: a new study published in the journal Science says that the sugary substance boosts the growth of cancerous tumors in mice.

The study, conducted by researchers at Cornell University and Baylor University, found that consuming a modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup every day—about the equivalent of drinking one can of soda—can accelerate the growth of cancerous tumors in mice’s intestines.

As part of the research trial, scientists generated mice with early-stage colon cancer. Then, the scientists gave the mice a moderate amount of sweetened water, with 25% high fructose corn syrup, each day. The amount was a modest amount, meant to mimic a human’s daily consumption of one can of sugary soda. After two months, the mice developed tumors that were higher-grade and larger in size than those mice treated with only water.

Scientists say that the results suggest that even moderate amounts of high fructose corn syrup can boost the growth of early-stage tumors in the intestines. Early stage tumors can occur in young adult humans without notice, but it typically takes 20-30 years for those small, benign tumors to develop into aggressive cancer. Although further studies are necessary to determine how these findings would translate to the human body, the scientists’ ultimate findings suggest that chronic consumption of high fructose corn syrup can shorten the time it takes for intestinal cancer to develop.

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